Wood & Cedar Siding Price Guide

Wood and cedar siding remain a popular choice for homes in many settings from suburban neighborhoods to country homesteads to cabins in the woods. It is found on very rustic dwellings as well as nicely-appointed upscale homes.

This wood and cedar siding price guide includes general information, strengths and weaknesses of wood, and price examples. You’ll know what you’re getting for your money so you can evaluate wood and cedar siding for your home.

Leading Brands of Wood & Cedar

There are some national distributors of wood siding, though most companies tend to be local. Start with names like Buffalo Lumber, Lumber Liquidators, Build Direct and TruWood. Your siding contractor will be able to recommend the best brands of wood siding in your area, or you can look for them at your local building supply stores.

Various Types & Textures of Wood & Cedar Siding

Starting with materials, the most common are cedar, redwood, fir, spruce and pine. Redwood and cedar both have natural weather-resistant and insect-resistant qualities, though they are often sealed as well. Pine, spruce and fir must be painted or sealed to make them durable.

The styles include both horizontal siding and vertical siding. Horizontal siding can be lapped or installed tongue and groove to present a more finished look. From most dealers, your choices include tongue and groove (T&G), bevel, Dutch lap, cove, shiplap and channel rustic. The most popular dimensions for both horizontal and vertical siding are 1×6, 1×8, 1×10 and 1×12.

The wood might also be graded according to the absence or presence of knots in the wood. You’ll see phrases such as “clear” which means free of knots, “select tight knot” (STK) which means it contains some small knots that give the wood character, “grade B” which means just a few larger knots. Of course, knotty pine is full of knots, a feature that gives it the desired appearance.

Estimate Wood & Cedar Siding Prices

Wood siding is competitively priced with other options such as high-end vinyl siding, aluminum siding, fiber cement siding and some stone veneers or brick veneers. The quality of the wood affects prices. For pine, fir, spruce and “B” grade cedar, expect to pay $2.75-$3.75 per square foot ($275-$350 per square if sold in 100 sq. ft. bundles). For top-grade cedar and redwood siding, your price will be $4-$6.50 per square foot or $400-$650 per square.

Wood and cedar siding comes in raw wood, primed, sealed or painted finishes. When the distributor has prefinished the wood in any way, expect to pay $.25 to $.75 per square foot extra.

Visit our Exterior Siding Material Guides page for a quick comparison of vinyl siding, aluminum siding, log siding, and wood & cedar siding.

Is wood or cedar siding right for you? Take into account the style and architecture of your home. Then consider how much time or money you’re willing to invest in maintenance. Finally, if the cost of the siding and ongoing maintenance fits your budget, then wood and cedar siding is a legitimate option for your home.

Pros and Cons of Wood & Cedar

The main reason most people choose cedar or some other type of wood siding is its natural beauty. There is a reason both vinyl siding and aluminum siding mimic wood siding – wood siding is very attractive, warm and inviting. It smells great too, and gives any home a very comfortable, welcoming aura. Cedar has a heavy wood grain pattern while other wood species have unique looks of their own.

Most wood species take stain and sealant quite well. When the staining, sealing or painting is done correctly, the finish is quite maintenance free. Hosing off dirt or using a mild soap and sponge is all that is required to keep it looking good, until it needs to be painted or stained again.

Cedar and redwood naturally repel insects and any wood that is properly sealed or painted will keep them out. However, if the seal begins to fail, insects can invade fairly quickly. Most wood siding, when it is properly maintained, will last 30 years minimum and might last 100 years or more.

Some woods are more readily available closer to where they grow. For example, Western Redwood is easier and less expensive to obtain in the West. Fir is very common and affordable in the East.

The main reason homeowners stay away from wood and cedar siding is the relatively high maintenance required over the years. Depending on your climate, you should plan to reseal or repaint your wood siding every 2-5 years. The other major concern about wood siding is that it burns quite readily compared with vinyl siding, aluminum, fiber cement, brick or stone.